Baby Shower Themes and Planning Tips

Often, the first step in planning a baby shower is picking a theme. Even picking a color theme can make your planning easier by narrowing down the choices! Blue for a boy and pink for a girl are traditional, but of course any palette can be charming.

Fun and creative baby shower themes

Tea Party: A chic alternative to your standard baby shower, guests can dress in formal attire and enjoy a sophisticated sit-down party with real china, fresh flowers, and elegant food.

Book Shower: All the guests are invited to bring their favorite children’s book! You can include something fun like a stuffed toy or game that matches the subject of your book.  A great way to start baby’s library!

Mommy Shower: Focus on the mom-to-be instead of the baby! This is a great idea especially if she’s already got a lot of the baby paraphernalia she needs. Guests can bring gifts for mom such as gift certificates to her favorite (grown-up) store, fashion accessories, books, etc.

Scrapbooking Shower: If the mom-to-be is a scrapbooker, have all the guests bring something meaningful, useful, or funny to include on her scrapbook page. It can be something written, like a story, poem, letter, or parenting advice. It can be photos or other objects that recall a fond memory. Lots of creative options!

Noah’s Ark: A fun theme for the mom expecting twins–guests bring 2 of everything!

Nine Months: Everyone is invited to come to the party nine-months pregnant! Stuff your top with pillows so the mom-to-be won’t feel self-conscious… it’s a great ice-breaker too if your guests don’t all know each other!

Freezer Party: If mom is expecting a second or third, she may not need all the stuff that new moms need. Instead, each guest can bring a freezer-friendly meal to be put away for later! Now the family has a home-cooked meal to eat even when mom does not feel up to cooking.

Baby Shower Invitations

Once you’ve got an idea or theme for your party, the next step is picking out invitations!

E-mail or Snail mail: Email is the economical choice, but it’s always fun to send and receive real paper invitations. There are so many lovely colors, patterns, and designs to choose from!

Plan Ahead: Give your guests a few week’s notice. This will hopefully prevent them from scheduling something else on that day, and give ample time for gift shopping!

All the Info: Make sure to include all the important information such as date, time, and location, who it’s for and RSVP instructions. Include registry information if the mom-to-be is registered anywhere. If you’re having a theme, let the guests know so they can plan/dress accordingly!

Baby Shower Planning

Here are some helpful guidelines and tips for planning a shower!

Hosting: Although traditionalists will say that a non-family member should throw the party (so it doesn’t look like anyone’s begging for gifts) it’s really OK for anyone to be involved in the planning.

When: Showers are usually held near the end of the pregnancy, when excitement about the new arrival is peaking. Having a baby shower after the baby is born is fine too, especially if the sex of the baby is being kept a surprise.

Guests: Consulting with the mom-to-be is definitely best when putting together a guest list. You don’t want to leave out anybody important! Baby showers are traditionally a women-only affair, but co-ed parties are becoming more popular… especially if Dad wants to be part of it.

On the Agenda: Showers usually consist of some sort of refreshment or meal, an activity or silly game, socializing, and gift opening. You can offer prizes for the game winners, or party favors for everyone. A theme can make the planning a lot easier to pull together!

Energizing Foods for Pregnancy

Being pregnant… it’s exhausting! And in the early months, when there’s not much to show for it, your hard-working body may not get much appreciation or relaxation.

But what is making you so tired? How can that tiny little growing being inside you be sapping so much of your energy? To fuel the baby-making, your body is producing more blood, your heart rate is up, your metabolism is working overtime, and you’re using up more nutrients and water. It also takes four months until the baby’s placenta  is complete. So it’s no wonder you are always fighting fatigue!

So when a nap is not an option, and the show must go on, what kind of energy boost can you hope for?  Sugar and caffeine may give you a temporary high, but after the initial surge in blood sugar you’ll plummet lower than before. What you need are some nutritious, energy-boosting foods to help you get through the day.

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image credit: all diets review

Grazing (eating 5 or 6 small meals instead of 3 big ones) may be the best way to eat while pregnant. You’ll keep your energy levels even and avoid the nausea that may accompany a too-large meal. And be sure to drink plenty of water.

And while you’re not literally “eating for two,” your body does need about 300 extra calories per day.  Bon appétit!

Protein: Recommendation for pregnancy: 75 grams of it per day. Helps keep you energized and aids in the development of your baby’s rapidly reproducing cells.

  • milk, cheese, and yogurt
  • eggs
  • lean meat and poultry
  • fish and seafood
  • beans, lentils, split peas
  • quinoa
  • nuts and seeds

Complex Carbohydrates:

  • whole-grain breads, crackers, and cereals
  • fresh, dried, and frozen fruits
  • fresh vegetables
  • baked potatoes with skin
  • dried beans and peas

Iron: Fatigue can be related to iron-deficiency anemia, especially in pregnant women. Iron-rich foods will keep your irons stores elevated and help pump up your energy level.

  • dried fruit
  • spinach
  • soy products
  • lean red meat
  • duck
  • cooked shellfish
  • cooked dried beans
  • oatmeal
  • iron-fortified cereals

Putting it all together: Here are just a few meal and snack ideas to help you get that little extra energy-lift.

  • Sandwiches of whole-grain bread filled with grated cheese, tuna, lettuce and tomatoes.
  • Salads with fresh veges and feta cheese
  • Low-fat yogurt with dried fruit and granola
  • Hummus with bread or vegetable sticks
  • Fresh fruit
  • dried fruits and nuts
  • Hearty soups with veges, beans, legumes, chicken or meat
  • Oatmeal or unsweetened breakfast cereals
  • Fruit-shakes and fresh-squeezed juice
  • Chicken breast with baked potato and steamed veges
  • Whole-grain pasta topped with grilled veges and salmon

How to Sleep Better During Pregnancy

You’re tired. You also have a bit of heartburn. Your back hurts, your legs are cramping. Maybe you feel restless, anxious about the future, overwhelmed with so many things going on at once. You might feel short of breath, and find it hard to get comfortable. And then, as you finally start to drift off, you get that uncomfortably-full feeling in your bladder and up we go to the bathroom yet again!

In your first trimester, you’ll find that you feel extra sleepy all the time, which is brought on by high levels of progesterone. Your second trimester might bring a period of peaceful sleep, but don’t get to used to it because when the third trimester comes along, with that beautiful belly getting bigger every day, sleep may seem like a distant memory.

You’re exhausted, but you can’t sleep! Help!

Sleep Position:

Lying on your side with your knees tucked in is likely to be the most comfortable position. It also take some stress off your heart, because it keeps the baby’s weight off of the inferior vena cava, the large vein that carries blood back to the heart from your feet and legs. Also, if you sleep on your left side, it helps take the pressure of your uterus off your liver. It also helps with digestion and improves circulation to the heart, fetus, uterus, and kidneys.

Pillow Relief:

Some women feel more comfortable with a pillow under their tummy, between their legs, or at the small of your back may help to relieve some pressure. This is something you’ll have to experiment with a bit, and maybe try one of the various “pregnancy pillows” on the market.

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maternity pillows

Watch what and when you eat:

Take it easy on the caffeinated drinks like soda, coffee, and tea. If you can’t give up your caffeine, try to restrict it to earlier part of the day.

You need to get plenty of fluid and nutrition during the day, but try to avoid eating and drinking a lot within a few hours of bedtime. Eat larger meals for breakfast and lunch, and a smaller meal at dinner. If you’re bothered by nausea, a few crackers before you go to sleep may do the trick.

Relief for Heartburn:

The first step is to avoid foods that trigger heartburn. Some common culprits are carbonated drinks, alcohol, caffeine, citrus fruits and juices, tomatoes, mustard, vinegar, mint products, processed meats, and any foods that are spicy, highly seasoned, fried, or fatty.  Again, eat small, frequent meals, and chew your food slowly and thoroughly. Don’t eat for a few hours before bedtime.  Elevating your head and upper body may help keep stomach acids where they belong.

Create an inviting sleep environment:

If you can get into a routine of going to bed and waking up at the same time each day, it will help you fall asleep at night. Try to do something relaxing just before you get into bed, like taking a warm bath, drinking something soothing, like tea with honey, or ask your partner for a little foot massage. Exercising during the day may help your body release pent up energy which will help you sleep at night, but don’t exercise right before bedtime.

Leg Cramps:

No one can sleep through a leg cramp! To make it go away, try pressing your feet hard against the wall or to stand on the leg.  Also, make sure that you’re getting enough calcium in your diet, which can help reduce leg cramps.

Reduce Stress:

If your days are always spent on the go, consider a prenatal yoga class or some other relaxation exercise to help you unwind. If you are worried about the birth or how you will cope with a new baby, a childbirth or parenting class will help you feel more confident about the future. Knowledge, and the company of other women in a similar position, may be comforting and help you sleep better at night.

Take Naps:

Regardless of everything you do, there are times when you just can’t sleep. In these cases, short naps during the day can be a life-saver. Instead of tossing and turning, get up and do something: read a book, catch up on letters or email, put in a load of laundry, wash the dishes. Eventually, you’ll probably feel tired enough to get back to sleep.  Then, you’ll have cleared up some space the next day for a nice hour’s nap!

The Case Against Planned Inductions

The last few weeks of your pregnancy are not “optional.” They are an important time for your baby’s development which should not be cut short by an early induction. If there are valid medical reasons for labor induction, your health-care provider will help you decide on the best course of action. But if you just want to schedule an induction for the sake of convenience or any other non-medical reason, here are some things to consider:

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feature image: Baby Announcement Wording

1. Less than 10% of babies actually arrive on their “due date.” Experts agree that a normal pregnancy lasts between 38 and 42 weeks. About 7 out of 10 babies are born after their due date! There is NO way to predict with absolute accuracy what day your baby will be born, you will have to trust your body and your baby to let you know w hen it’s time!

2. Unless you have had a first-trimester ultrasound, gestational dating is largely inaccurate. Later ultrasounds can be off by 2-3 weeks, meaning an induction at 38 weeks might actually be taking place sooner than intended.

3. First time mothers are more often overdue than not! Even 42 weeks PLUS is “normal” and is not a reason to rush into an induction.

4. The last few weeks that a baby spends in utero are an important time for baby’s development, most importantly brain development. A surge of hormones in your baby’s body might play a part in initiating labor.  According to Lamaze, research indicates that once your baby’s lungs are fully mature, he releases a protein that tells his mother’s body that it’s time. A baby born even a few weeks early is at an increased risk for breathing problems, admission to special-care nurseries and breastfeeding difficulties.

5. Which brings us to our next point: Full-term babies (39-40 weeks) are healthier! According to Time: “It’s kind of surprising that insurance providers haven’t curtailed the practice of early elective deliveries entirely as babies born sooner tend to have more health complications and cost more. Even babies delivered at 37 to 38 weeks can end up costing 10 times as much as a full-term newborn, according to the March of Dimes. One study found that reducing early elective deliveries to under 2% could save close to $1 billion in health care each year.”

6. An induced labor is likely to be longer, more intense, and more invasive than a natural labor. You will need IV fluids and continuous electronic fetal monitoring. You will be more likely to use an epidural to deal with the intense contractions. Inductions don’t always work according to plan, often necessitating  forceps, vacuum assistance, and c-sections. Relative to c-section babies, babies who go through labor are born more alert and are better able to breathe and latch on at the breast. (Read this article in Time.com)

7. Better in than out! All of my babies were over-due, and 3 children later I have come to the conclusion that babies are much less trouble in the uterus than out! That is my own personal opinion, of course, and I do love my children dearly!

Bottom line: Be respectful of your baby and let him be a player in his own birth. The safest birthing option for you and your baby is to wait for labor to begin on its own, and in this way you’ll give him the best possible start as he enters our world.

Belly Mapping: How YOU can determine your baby’s position

Belly mapping is a way that moms can tell what position their baby is in, during the last couple months of pregnancy.  This is helpful because it can alert  you to potential complications that may arise during childbirth, which could lead to a complicated labor or a C-section. Often it is impossible for your doctor to know what position the baby is in by doing an internal examination– an ultrasound would be required. However, belly mapping provides a way to figure it out on your own! Then, your doula can help you to change the baby’s position.

Click here to read the complete article by DONA International, via SpinningBabies.com.

Download the free Belly Mapping parent handout in English,

Your Beautiful Baby-Making Body

As your entire body seems to expand to accommodate and nurture your growing baby, it’s important to banish any feelings of resentment over the extra weight gain. Some women naturally rejoice in their new status as a mommy-to-be, while others find it difficult to do in today’s body-obsessed culture.

It’s important to be positive when viewing your new figure, appreciating not only your enhanced bra size and glowing skin, but also your wider hips, fuller face, and stretch marks.

Purge your vocabulary of words like “fat” and “huge.” Embrace words such as soft, womanly, voluptuous, curvy, nurturing, fertile, radiant, miraculous. You have been chosen to receive a tremendous gift, a new life, and your very own body is a partner in the creation of this baby.

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image credit

“Pregnant women become spiritually and physically attractive,” writes Frederick Wirth, MD, author of Prenatal Parenting: The Complete Psychological and Spiritual Guide to Loving Your Unborn Child. “There’s a serene radiance of fertility and ripeness.” That’s a wonderful way to think about the beauty and wonder of your body changing in response to your baby developing inside you. Believe in that and nurture yourself during this time. The way you act, feel and think as an expectant mother actually has a profound impact on your baby. (Lamaze.org)

You may not be thrilled with the weight gain, but keep in mind that your body is working toward a very high purpose.  Your body is doing exactly what it was made to do!  Take care to nurture yourself physically by eating wisely, drinking lots of water, exercising, and getting enough sleep. Charge yourself emotionally by reading magazines, web sites and books that help you build confidence rather than cause you to worry. Spend time with good friends and family, and make time for yourself as well. Nourish yourself spiritually by believing in yourself and recognizing that you are a partner with God in bringing a new, precious soul into the world.

Picture to yourself the moment when you will hold your newborn baby in your arms, and know that it is all worth it.

Read more at Lamaze.org

“Are They Real Contractions?” Drink a Glass of Wine!

Toward the end of your pregnancy, you may experience Braxton Hicks contractions, which feel like real labor pains but do not signify the onset of labor. There are various ways to tell if they are the real deal or not, but if you call your doctor or midwife in a panic, they make this suggestion: Relax, and have a glass of wine. If the contractions are real, they’ll intensify, but if they are Braxton Hicks, they will likely go away very soon after.

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But is it safe for the baby?

Drinking an occasional glass of wine during pregnancy has been a controversial topic. Obviously, frequent or heavy drinking is dangerous for your baby, but a glass of wine here and there is where opinions differ. Some maintain that the effects of alcohol on a fetus are still unknown and it’s better to avoid alcoholic beverages altogether. Others (like most Europeans!) believe that there’s nothing wrong with an occasional drink and indulge themselves without giving it a second thought.

Regardless of where you stand on the issue, one glass of wine toward the end of your pregnancy probably doesn’t pose any hazard to your baby’s health. And if it stops the Braxton Hicks and puts your mind at ease, it’s an added bonus! L’Chayim!

Drink some water too…

Being dehydrated can bring on false labor pains as well. So in addition to your glass of wine, be sure to drink plenty of water, which may help ease Braxton Hicks as well!

Contractions: Are These the Real Thing?

During the third trimester, some women experience “false” contractions called Braxton-Hicks contractions. This is a normal occurrence, and like real labor contractions, they may increase in frequency and intensity, making you worry that you are going into premature labor. But unlike true labor, these contractions don’t grow consistently longer, stronger, and closer together.

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image from Women Health Tips

How to tell if it’s preterm labor: True labor contractions show a definite pattern. Employ the 1-5-1 formula: if your contractions last at least one minute, are five minutes (or less) apart, and continue for at least one hour you are, most likely, in labor. (This would mean you should alert your health-care provider immediately.) Braxton-Hicks contractions come and go and don’t settle into a regular pattern. Don’t forget to practice relaxing and breathing with these trial-run contractions. (Dr. Sears)

If you are within a few weeks of your due date, but the Braxton Hicks contractions are making you uncomfortable, try these measures:

  • Change your activity or position. If you’ve been sitting or laying down, try walking around. If you’re been  moving a lot, resting may provide relief. (On the other hand, true labor contractions will progress regardless of what you do.)
  • Take a warm bath to help your body relax.
  • Drink water; these contractions are sometimes brought on by dehydration.
  • Relaxation exercises and slow, deep breathing may help you cope with the discomfort.

Should I call the doctor?

If you haven’t reached 37 weeks yet, and are having more than four contractions in an hour, or contractions are becoming more frequent, rhythmic, or painful, call your caregiver immediately.  In this case, it’s better to play it safe and don’t try to make the diagnosis yourself. Preterm labor is not something to take chances with. Other possible signs of preterm labor:

  • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in an hour (even if they don’t hurt)
  • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting
  • An increase in vaginal discharge or a change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucusy, or bloody (even if it’s only pink or blood-tinged)
  • Increased pelvic pressure (a feeling that your baby’s pushing down)
  • Low back pain, especially if it’s a new problem for you

Are my Feet Getting Bigger?!

If you have a funny feeling that your feet are getting larger and heavier (kind of like your abdomen), you are probably not imagining it. Toward the middle of your pregnancy, you may notice some swelling (or edema), which is caused by the fluid collecting in your ankles and feet, especially after a day of standing.

In addition to this fine feeling, your feet may be subject to normal ligament looseness that develops throughout your body, causing your weight-bearing tootsies to stretch and widen, and arches to fall. Try stuffing that, together with the extra body fat you’re accumulating, into a shoe, and it’s no wonder you prefer your fuzzy bedroom slippers.

But you are not alone. Most women find themselves wearing at least a half-size larger shoe in the second half of their pregnancy, and for about fifteen percent of moms, this change is permanent (ouch!).

Be kind to your feet! Dr. Sears suggests some ways you can help alleviate their burden (which would be you):
  • Elevate them as much as possible.
  • Avoid standing for long times without a break.
  • Do foot exercises: flex your toes and then pull them toward you as you point the heel away from you. Extend your leg, point your toes up, and make a circle with your toes, rotating your whole foot and ankle. This also exercises the calf muscles after standing or sitting for a long time.
  • Solicit a foot massage: the masseur holds the aching foot in both hands, places his thumb just under the ball of the foot, and moves along the arch, massaging in slow, circular strokes.
  • Nurse swollen, painful, day’s-end feet in cool water.
  • Allow your feet to breathe by using cotton socks.
  • Choose shoes with wide, low heels (no higher than two inches) or wedges. Non-skid soles make you more sure-footed. Try soft leather or canvas shoes, preferably without laces, since sooner or later you won’t be able to bend over to tie them.
  • Shop for new shoes at the end of the day when your feet are most swollen.
  • Try orthotics – plastic arch supports that fit into your shoes. These are available at most shoe stores, pharmacies, or molded custom by a podiatrist.

feature image (or should I say feet-ure image) from VillageMama

Don’t Eat These Foods if you’re Pregnant!

Everything you eat and drink while you’re expecting influences your baby’s health.  Good choices are whole grains, lean meats, lots of fresh fruits and veges, legumes, and low-fat dairy products. As for the rest… well some foods are questionable, some are OK in moderation, and some are all-out no-no’s.

Here’s some “food for thought:” consider these guidelines before indulging in every pregnancy craving:

Raw or Undercooked Animal Products

These foods may contain an array of bacteria, viruses, and parasites.  When cooking meat, chicken, and fish, it’s recommended to test the doneness with a food thermometer, cook eggs until they are no longer runny, and don’t eat raw dough. Here are some other things to watch out for:

  • rare meat
  • raw oysters
  • clams
  • sushi
  • unpasteurized eggs
  • raw cookie or cake dough
  • homemade eggnog

Hot Dogs, Cold Cuts, & Unpasteurized Dairy Foods

These foods are prone to Listeria monocytogenes, a bacteria that causes listeriosis, which may result in miscarriage, stillbirth, or other serious health problems. These include food such as:

  • hot dogs and
  • luncheon meats (deli ham or turkey, bologna, salami, etc)
  • refrigerated pates or meat spreads
  • refrigerated smoked seafood (such as salmon, trout, whitefish, cod, tuna, or mackerel)– may be labeled “nova-style,” “lox,” “kippered,” “smoked,” or “jerky.”
  • raw milk and unpasteurized dairy products such as Brie, feta, Camembert, Roquefort, blue-veined, queso blanco, queso fresco, and queso Panela.

It’s safe to eat smoked seafood, lunch meants, and franks, when it’s part of a cooked dish (like in a casserole) or if you reheat them until they are steaming hot. Always wash your hands, utensils, and cooking surfaces after handling raw meats, deli meats, etc.

Certain Seafood and Fish

Some large fish harbor high concentrations of mercury, a byproduct of coal-burning plants that interferes with the normal development of a child’s brain and nervous system.

  • Fish to avoid: swordfish, shark, tilefish, and king mackerel
  • Fish to eat in moderation (up to 12 ounces weekly, according to the FDA):  salmon (farmed and wild), shrimp, canned light tuna, pollock, sardines, tilapia, and catfish.
  • albacore (white) tuna has more mercury than canned light tuna. Limit to 6 ounces a week.
  • Fish caught for sport in rivers, lakes, ponds, and streams may also contain industrial pollutants that play havoc with a developing nervous system. Check the safety with your local health departments.

Raw Vegetable Sprouts

The FDA advises pregnant women not to eat raw sprouts — including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts.   Bacteria such as E. coli and Salmonella can get into sprout seeds, posing a danger for a weaker immune system. Cooked sprouts are perfectly fine.

Drinks to Limit or Avoid

  • Alcohol (beer, wine, or spirits) robs developing cells of oxygen and nutrients, preventing normal fetal development. The effects of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome on intellectual abilities and physical growth are permanent. While some assume the motto “Everything in moderation,” there is no known “safe level” of alcohol consumption during pregnancy.
  • Unpasteurized juices, such as cider from neighborhood farms. These products may contain germs including E. coli.
  • Lead in tap water is linked to low birth weight, preterm delivery, and developmental delays in children. If you have an older home with lead pipes, it can leach into your tap water, and home filtration systems may not prevent it from reaching you.
  • Caffeine from coffee, tea, soft drinks, energy beverages, and other sources may increase the risk of miscarriage, reduced birth weight, and stillbirth, but the research is conflicting. The March of Dimes recommends limiting caffeine consumption to 200 milligrams a day. That’s about the amount found in 12 ounces of coffee.

Bisphenol A (BPA)

BPA is an industrial chemical used to make many hard plastics and the liners of many canned foods. It’s an endocrine disruptor that could disturb normal fetal development.

The FDA has not yet recommended that pregnant women avoid BPA, but they did express concern about “the potential effects of BPA on the brain, behavior, and prostate gland of fetuses, infants, and children.”

If you wish to be safe, a wide range of BPA-free plastics and glass containers are available.

Herbal Teas, Vitamins, & Supplements

There are herbs and other supplements that can be used safely to support a healthy pregnancy, but always talk to your doctor or midwife about any supplement use during pregnancy.  Herbal teas are caffeine-free, but there are definite studies on the safety of herbal preparations during pregnancy.

Duffy MacKay, ND, is the vice president of the Council for Responsible Nutrition, suggests the following guidelines during pregnancy:

  • Herbs that contain stimulants or caffeine-containing supplements, especially those that are intended to promote weight loss: guarana, kola nut, betel (Piper betle), Citrum aurantium, yohimbe, theobromine (cocoa extract), Garcinai cambogia.
  • Other botanicals to avoid include golden seal, Cascara sagrada, black walnut, wormwood, tansy, pennyroyal, senna, saw palmetto, pao d’arco.
  • Do not exceed 10,000 or more IU per day of vitamin A because of the risk of birth defects.  MacKay adds that “many newer and specialty nutrients have not been proven safe for use during pregnancy and should be avoided.”

Foods That May Cause Food Allergy

Your baby is more lifely to develop food allergies if you, your child’s father, or one of your other children has allergies.  The American Academy of Pediatrics  says that avoiding certain food allergens (such as peanuts) during pregnancy and nursing may reduce allergy in susceptible children.

If you don’t have any family history of allergies, there is little, if any, benefit to avoiding allergens during pregnancy and breastfeeding.  Before changing your diet, talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian who is knowledgeable about food allergies.

Excess Calories

Eating for two does not mean that you need twice the calories! Gaining too much weight is not just bad for your health, it may actually increase the risk of your future child being overweight.

It is important to chose healthy foods that will provide good nutrition for you and your developing baby. If you are overweight at conception or if your physical activity level declines, you may not need as many extra calories.

  • First trimester: no need to add extra calories yet.
  • Second trimester: add 340 calories a day to your pre-pregnancy calorie needs.
  • Third trimester: add 450 calories a day to your pre-pregnancy calorie needs.

It’s usually not that important to count calories, as long as you are eating a balanced diet and feel energized. If you are unsure about how many calories to consume, ask your doctor or dietitian.

Source: Web MD

feature image: mom logic

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